Forum: What Is Your Reaction To The Obama Administration’s Recent Policy Change To Allow Women In Combat ?

Every week on Monday morning , the Council and its invited guests weigh in at the Watcher’s Forum, short takes on a major issue of the day. This week’s question:What Is Your Reaction To The Obama Administration’s Recent Policy Change To Allow Women In Combat ?

The Razor: If it’s fine for the Israelis, it’s fine by me. As far as I’m concerned in the battle with militant Islam we are all on the frontlines – men, women, old and young.

GrEaT sAtAn”S gIrLfRiEnD:Combat girls? Reckon all girls should sign up for Selective Service, then…

 The Noisy Room:I know that many women will disagree with me, but I think allowing women in combat and on the front lines is a horrific decision on several fronts. First of all, it is instinctual for a man to protect a woman, no matter what they say. If a man sees a woman in distress during combat, he is much more likely to put himself at risk (and the mission) and run to her aid. Physically, women are just not as able to handle the rigors of combat as men are either. War is hell and it is brutal business. It tends to haunt men for the rest of their lives as it did my father, who never spoke of WWII and the Kamikaze attack on his ship. An attack which killed everyone on the deck but my father and many of those deaths were from sheer shock. He suffered nightmares the rest of his life and woke up swinging at remembered enemies. Is it wise to subject the mothers of children to such horrific circumstances? It changes you. These men, many times, come home broken physically and emotionally. It is a sacrifice men have carried for millenia and it is a role that is meant for men to lead in. It is not a matter of sexism, it is a matter of survival. The brotherhood of the special forces shouldn’t be diminished by mixing the genders, exposing the ranks to sexual situations and tensions and feminizing our warriors. Men have always put women first, it is our heritage and we shouldn’t mess with that instinct. Let the guys be the badasses and handle the enemy – hand to hand, up close, with at least a chance of survival.

If a man is captured, he may be tortured and killed. If a woman is captured, especially if it involves Jihadists, her fate will be a thousand times worse. She would not only be raped over and over, but her death would not come quickly. She would be used as bait to kill others. Whereas this ploy does not generally work with male prisoners, it is far more likely to succeed with a female as females strike a deeper chord in our subconscious. This is why females are used as suicide bombers. While Israel’s IDF forces require women to serve three years, one can understand this because they don’t have the breadth and depth of soldiers to draw from. Until 2000, these women served in non-combat roles, but since 2000, as I understand it, they instituted an Equality amendment that provides that women can serve in any position men do. Currently about 3% serve as combat soldiers and the military leadership is having some of the same discussions we are. This does not change my viewpoint of women being on the front lines.

All of this is unnecessary. Women are great in command positions and under stress. They are great as pilots and in other positions. But on the war front, in my opinion, they are an unnecessary distraction from the task at hand. This is a further weakening of our military. It is par for the course for Leon Panetta. It is meant to appease the liberal base for Barack Obama, without an eye to the rigors of combat and the realities of war. Women now truly have an equal opportunity to be drafted and a greater opportunity to die. This is a move guaranteed to get more people killed – but hey, the elites making the rules aren’t on the front lines are they? Not yet any way.

 The Glittering Eye:Since the laws capping the number of women and restrictions on rank in the military in the United States were

repealed in 1967 and women were allowed in jobs in which combat was likely to be seen starting in the 1990s, women in combat have been a foregone conclusion. The challenges now are in preserving force readiness.

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