May 26, 2017

Of War and Healing

This week’s winning submissions cover a broad spectrum of topics from the heath care industry and medical pay for doctors to the war between Israel and Hamas (and in some respects the rest of the Arab world with rockets entering Israel from both Lebanon and Gaza; rockets that were manufactured elsewhere and smuggled in).

The winning council entry comes from The Razor and touches on a topic near and dear to my heart; the health care industry. Please read it as you consider that Democrats are seeking to”change” the heath care industry in the United States. Now I am all for change but the government is not the answer here, at least not in the form of socialized medicine. The Razor discusses the tremendous costs for Primary Care physicians and the limited potential for reimbursement due to various logistical and government induced reasons.

One topic of discussion that I’d like to see expanded upon is medical billing. Currently doctors are beholden to the insurance companies, all of which have their own rules for payment related to rules, regulations and other factors such as medical diagnosis coding on bills, credentialing and something called timely which related to the period of time between seeing a patient and submitting a bill to the insurance company or the government. If billing doesn’t meet strict criterion then the insurance companies reject the bill, which forces another round of administrative hassle. The problem being that each insurance company has their own set of rules surrounding timely, coding and a ton of other factors. Medical billing is a nightmare, the deck is stacked against doctors and many leave money on the tables; i.e. they don’t get paid for services because of administrative and bureaucratic reasons. The system sucks and the government is to blame.

This even gets worse for medicare patients. The government is notorious for incompetence in this area. Worse however is that most doctors take a loss on medicare patients, which explains why physicians limit the number of medicare patients they will take on. Keep this in mind as you read the winning council entry.

The winning non-council entry by Ron Rosenbaum compares Hamas to the Nazi party and you will be saddened to discover the narrow gulf between today’s terrorist enemies of Israel and that of the Nazi Party. Some difference do exist between the various responses to Israel’s plight as well as with the way Israel approaches the enemy at her border.

For example:

–FDR called for the “unconditional surrender” of Hitler and the Nazis. The UN, and international human rights organizations call for “proportionality” in the treatment of the Nazi-like murderers of Hamas which translates, apparently to using only enough force so that Hamas can keep on firing rockets at Jews at the same rate as before, a situation they found acceptable as testified to by their silence and inaction.

So that’s a big difference.

–The Allies in World War II did not care about causing civilian casualties in the course of seeking the defeat of the Nazi empire. In fact they thought the Nazi regime, busily engaged in genocide and the German people who supported him did not deserve especially “humane” or “proportional” treatment. The Israelis today go to great, even self-destructive lengths to avoid civilian casualties in trying to combat those who seek their extermination, despite the fact that Hamas is a self-proclaimed genocidal organization.

So that’s another difference.

Rosenbaum provides a fascinating perspective that is well worth reading and sharing at this terrible time when Israel’s friends are decreasing as liberals flock to justify the methods and means of terrorists.

Please read and share this week’s important winning entries!

Winning Council Submissions

Winning Non-Council Submissions

4 Trackbacks / Pingbacks

  1. The Glittering Eye » Blog Archive » The Council Has Spoken!
  2. Cheat Seeking Missiles » Watcher’s Winners: Hamas Week
  3. Bookworm Room » The winners at the Watcher’s Council
  4. The Razor » Blog Archive » The Council Has Spoken: Jan 9, 2009

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