May 26, 2017

The Council has Spoken 081310

First of all thank you very much to JoshuaPundit for handling the submissions while I was away on vacation.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xcq32y_positively-4th-street_music

When you know as well as me
You’d rather see me paralyzed
Why don’t you just come out once
And scream it

Positively 4th Street – Bob Dylan

This week’s council vote ended in a tie between JoshuaPundit’s A Mosque At Ground Zero and Rhymes with Right’s We Are The Revolution People. After careful consideration I cast my tie breaking vote for the former, a complete treatment of the issues related to the proposed “Islamic community center,” near Ground Zero.

One point that bears repeating is this:

The very name Cordoba House invokes Islamist triumph, invoking the capitol of Islam’s Spanish conquests at the height of Islam’s power.

In its celebration of the landmark committee’s decision to allow demolition of the existing structure, the editors of the Washington Post announced
A vote for religious freedom: N.Y. panel clears way for mosque near Ground Zero with a bit of wishful history:

The $100 million Cordoba House takes its name from the medieval Spanish city where Muslims, Jews and Christians lived in peace for 800 years. The developers promise to act in that spirit by bringing people together in peace, healing and collaboration at a center that would include a 500-seat auditorium, art exhibition space, a swimming pool and retail space. It would also include a mosque. This sparked vocal opposition not only in New York but throughout the country.

Actually, Jews, Christians and Muslims lived peacefully in Cordova, as long as the Jews and Christians paid a special tax to the ruling Muslims to live there as second class citizens. Perhaps Jews lived better under Muslim rule in Spain than they did elsewhere in Europe, but that doesn’t erase the burdens that came with living under Muslim rule. This period of relative tolerance ended in the 1140’s (well short of 800 years) when the Almohads conquered Andalusia and offered non-Muslims the choice to convert or die. The name “Cordoba” evokes images of peaceful coexistence in the same way that “Bull Connor” evokes images of equal treatment under the law.

Related: see today’s column by Charles Krauthammer.

For the second time in recent weeks, our winning non-council post was written by the internet’s foremost satirist Iowahawk, who, this week, wrote, Undocumented Imam’s Refusal to Perform Interracial Gay Handicapped Wedding Leads to Charges of Racism. Here’s a brief taste.

Following the incident, Davis, who is African-American, called a press conference on the sidewalk in front of the Cordoba House to complain of racial and gender discrimination. She was eventually shoved from the podium by Abdul Mohammed-Haq, the Mosque’s controversial Yemeni Imam who is currently battling a federal deportation case against the ICE, who countered with complaints of profiling discrimination by Davis and Markowicz. Within minutes the streets in front of the center were filled with chanting protesters from the Gay, Muslim, Black and handicapped communities. A disaster was narrowly averted when the Reverend Al Sharpton’s limousine rammed a parked EMS ambulance before it could careen through the crowd.

Amid the growing crisis, New York mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered a SWAT team of negotiators from the city’s Multicultural Affairs Office parachuted to the scene. A brief truce was reached when negotiators pointed out to the Imam Markowicz’s status as a pre-op transexual, obviating his religious objections to performing a same-sex marriage. But tensions erupted again after Markowicz – who is legally blind – tried to enter the mosque with a seeing-eye guide dog.

Iowahawk brilliantly weaves a tapestry of satire using disparate threads of politically correct thought.

Council Winners

Non-Council Winners

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