THE DEATH OF ERNIE PYLE’S CAPTAIN WASCOW, THE FILM VERSION 1945

Vassar Bushmills

William Wellman was an Academy Award-winning Hollywood director, especially of some of the most memorable westerns and war classics, A Star is Born, Beau Geste (Gary Cooper) Ox-Bow Incident (Henry Fonda) Battleground (Van Johnson) Across the Wide Missouri (Clark Gable) High and the Mighty and Blood Alley (John Wayne) Darby’s Rangers (James Garner.)

In 1945 he directed “The Story of G I Joe” based on the published story by Ernie Pyle “The Death of Captain Wascow”, 1944, a much-loved-by-his-troops company commander, Henry Wascow, who was killed during the infantry’s five-month battle to take the ancient monastery of Monte Cassino, about 80 miles SE of Rome in the spring of 1944. Pyle’s story is still a popular read here at VassarBushmills.com

“GI Joe” was a character largely created by Bill Mauldin in his hundreds of cartoons of Willie and Joe as members of the Infantry as they slogged through Sicily and Italy.

Much of Wellman’s film was photographed in the lights and darks of the Mauldin drawings, only it wasn’t funny.

The “Story of G I Joe” was filmed and released in 1945, before the war over, before Ernie Pyle had been sent to the Pacific and killed by a sniper’s bullet[…]

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About Puma ByDesign 637 Articles
Unhyphenated American female, born and raised in the Empire State and who like most New Yorkers, in spite of being a registered Democrat, I voted for the candidate, not the party which meant voting often across party lines throughout the years. In 2008, coming to terms once and for all with the fact that Democrats and I had nothing in common, I left the liberal cesspool forever. Of course, I now have a grudge to settle after decades of being lied to and so I blog to right the wrongs and expose the lies.

1 Comment

  1. Although i was very young at the end of WWII, I grew up in the afterglow of the After Years and it was very real and ongoing for me. I am still held in the magic of that American Victory, its mindset, and what could have been, had not the stinking, blood-sucking, omnipresent, liberal commies eaten their way in like the destructive poison worms they are and have always been. I am sorry generations that followed mine—from the 1960’s onward—never knew, and will never know, those golden years and what it was like to be an American. I hope Vassar and La Puma will keep writing about those vanished years. Although I think it may be decades or a hundred years before anybody new cares again.

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